August 30, 2014

Where in the world are the Harricanes?

It's down the road a spell. Neither here or there. Might be in Wake County or in Granville County or in Franklin County. According to my mother, the center of the Harricanes was Pocomoke in western Franklin County. But according to my Aunt Doris, the Harricanes sat right on the Granville/Wake County line. 

But no matter who you might ask, everyone agrees the Harricanes can guarantee two things:  Moonshine and country people with a high suspicion of strangers. My family fit the mold perfectly on both counts. 

On Saturday afternoons, my Aunt Lib would tuck a bologna sandwich and some nabs in her pocketbook and ride the back roads of the Harricanes with my mother, her mother, or anyone who would get in the car. 

The area is known for it's many moonshine stills and rough people accustomed to scratching out a living from nothing. And more churches than you can shake a stick at.

The Raleigh News & Observer has written a few articles on the Harricanes over the years. Here's one


And of course, every time there was a large moonshine bust, it made the papers for miles around. You can read one of the more colorful stories here  about a female moonshiner and her underground still. 

Not much has changed in the Harricanes all these years. There's more people cause land is cheap, but I'm pretty sure you can still get all the Moonshine you might need - just so long as you go to church on Sunday.

August 28, 2014

Davis Family Reunion, October 4 in Wake Forest, NC


Join us for the Davis family reunion at Good Hope Church in Wake Forest, NC on Oct 4 starting at noon. Largely the descendants of Sidney Irvin Davis and Cordelia Davis, but ANY Davis is welcome!

It is a pig picking and sides. We provide the pig - you provide the sides!

4038 Graham Sherron Rd.
Wake Forest, NC 27587
Ph: (919) 527-2804


Email me with questions!

August 20, 2014

William Stancil Land Grant in Cumberland County, NC 1807


Cover:

Wm Stancil
100 Acres Land
No. 379

Grant:

State of North Carolina
Cumberland County


Surveyed Sept 26, 1807 for William Stancil

100 acres of land in said county warrant No. 379 and Ent. Oct 1, 1799

Beginning at a stake ?? on or near Elizabeth Stewart back line of her land toward Averas corner then at Averas line north sixty then past forty six chains to a pine in the edge of the south field road then south twenty four east seventeen chains and fifty links to a stake and pointer on Averas line then north forty four east thirty three chains and fifty links then north forty six and fifteen chains then south sixty six west seventy six chains along Elizabeth Stewart’s line of her back track to her line of the Avera survey then as that link to the Beginning.

Alexander Avera
James Carraway


James McNeil, Surv.

August 10, 2014

NCPedia: Things you never knew about North Carolina

Gosh knows I love my North Carolina. Born and raised here, I have said many times that I am extremely lucky to live in the land of my ancestors. Particularly the dead ones. <SMILE>


The NCPedia site is all about all things North Carolina. Here, you can browse biographies, people, culture, and history. Plus business, education, and geography. All part of North Carolina. It has nearly 7000 images.  

Highlights:

NC Trivia Quiz

Women in North Carolina

Folklore and Legends

Places of Interest 

State Symbols

Who knew we had a State Dog?? But seriously....a PLOTT HOUND??




They're cute and all, but I really think my darling Sophie would be an excellent candidate for State Dog!





Ever heard the State Toast? (Just to show what a North Carolina nerd I can be, it used to be part of my email signature!)
Here's the land of the longleaf pine
The summer land where the sun doth shine
Where the weak grow strong and the strong grow great
Here's to Down Home, the old North State

Read the rest of the toast here

August 9, 2014

Caraleigh Baptist Church, Raleigh, NC

Caraleigh Baptist Church began holding church services in 1898 in a brick dwelling house at 413 Montose Avenue in Raleigh. They were received into the Raleigh Association in 1904, which is the official date of their founding. 

Their next building - occupied from 1898 until 1924 - was a one room structure built on land donated by the Caraleigh Mill Company on Park Avenue (now Gilbert Street). 

In 1924, they moved into their present home which has a main auditorium, 13 Sunday School rooms, beautiful hammered glass windows, a belfry and bell, and a heating plant in the basement. The church sits at the corner of Summitt Avenue and Greene Street in the Caraleigh neighborhood just south of downtown Raleigh. This new church was built on land donated by Mr. Linneham and was officially dedicated in 1929. 

My grandparents, Atlas Allen and wife Ethel Davis, and their daughters Gladys, Lib, and Mary Joyce were devoted members of the church. Atlas and Ethel had bought their first home at 117 Summitt Avenue in July of 1938 in the heart of Caraleigh. The church was within easy walking distance of their new home, although I'm sure there were plenty of Sundays when the family headed north to Franklin County to attend services at Good Home Baptist Church in Youngsville.


Atlas and Ethel Davis Allen

August 8, 2014

Geeky Friday: Old Maps

Maps are cool. Especially old maps. And especially old maps of North Carolina and the counties I research. 

Here's some great info on using maps in genealogy

Over the years, I've bought a few old NC maps on eBay, but that can get to be an expensive hobby and these days I'd rather put my genealogy dollars elsewhere. 

I do have a few fav map sites and one sorta map site:

Early American Roads and Trails - these trails head west and most are not on the eastern seaboard, but if you have family who set out for the great unknown, information on westward trails will be very interesting.

Perry-Castaneda Map Collection - The University of Texas has a real gem here. Many of the maps were produced by the CIA and include topograhic (my personal fav) and aeronautical maps. Historical maps from all over the world. 

Library of Congress Map Collection - nearly 400,000 maps dating back to 1299. Map geek heaven.

Green's Path - one of the primary routes settlers used in migrating south from Virginia. Runs roughly the same route as today's I-95. Some of my ancestors were travelers on Green's Path.

It's going to be a rainy gray weekend here in Raleigh, NC. Perfect time to get lost in genealogy!


August 4, 2014

Franklin County, North Carolina

Franklin County is a relatively rural North Carolina county named for my very favorite historical genius, the late great Mr. Benjamin Franklin. 

It is north of the capital county of Wake and was formed from a now defunct county, Bute. It is to the right of Granville County. Granville, Franklin and Wake share a border, which makes it a lot of fun/grief when researching ancestors who thought nothing of hopping across county lines as they farmed, raised families, and made corn liquor.

For example, my mother was born in Franklin County. Her middle sister was born in Granville, and her youngest sister was born in Wake. And the family probably moved just a mile or so down the road between children.

Note!  Do not confuse Franklin County with Franklin, NC. They are at separate ends of the state.


Franklin County Genealogical Resources


Franklin County on USGenWeb

Franklin County genealogy at the Franklin County Public Library, Louisville, NC

Franklin County, NC on FamilySearch.org